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October 4, 2021

What is the Difference Between FM-200™ and 3M Novec 1230 Fluid?

As a business owner, having a reliable fire suppression system in place is one of the best ways to protect every part of your company, including your equipment, inventory, and employees. When it comes to class A, B, and C fires, clean agent fire suppression systems can be highly effective at eliminating a fire in its inception phase before it has the chance to grow, spread, and cause damage.

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September 29, 2021

With 3M™ Novec™ 1230’s Patent Expired, What is a Generic Clean Agent?

A clean agent fire suppression system is designed to minimize damage by acting quickly, suppressing a fire at the inception stage before it can grow. These systems are unique in that they are safe to use in occupied spaces, require no cleanup after discharge, don’t damage sensitive documents or equipment, and are environmentally friendly.

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September 22, 2021

How Long Does it Take for a Wind Turbine Fire to Cause Irreparable Damage?

The answer here is relatively straightforward: not long at all. But there are various types of damage to consider in the aftermath of a wind turbine fire. It includes physical damage – the tangible, visible burnt-out shell of a multi-million dollar wind turbine. And the conceptual, reputational damage that is invisible but has the potential to become so deep-seated that it is increasingly difficult to fix.

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September 17, 2021

Is CO2 a Clean Agent

When choosing your fire suppression system, one important thing to keep in mind is the aftermath of a discharge. While stopping the fire quickly is important, you also want to consider the impact of the fire suppression system you choose. After all, cleanup from a fire suppression event can be a long and arduous task if you choose a system that isn’t suited to your environment.

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September 13, 2021

What is the Difference: Fire Detection, Protection, and Suppression?

If you own a business, you know how devastating a fire can be. Not only do fires reduce profits by damaging property and equipment as well as increasing downtime, but they are a serious safety risk for you and your employees. And while not all fires are entirely preventable, there are many steps you can take to increase your chances of preventing fires and reacting quickly when one does occur.

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September 10, 2021

Wind Turbine OEM Versus Owner: Who is Responsible for What?

A lack of clarity around the accountability of fire risk management between wind farm owners and turbine manufacturers has put the wind sector at greater risk of suffering the damaging consequences of fire. Who is responsible for what? If a turbine catches fire, who is liable? The original equipment manufacturer (OEM) or the asset owner? Whose responsibility is it to ensure that turbines are equipped with fire suppression systems?

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August 31, 2021

3 Reasons Why the Wind Industry Must Tackle Public Concerns About Fire Risk

Wind energy has a crucial part to play in steering the earth away from a reliance on fossil fuels and ultimately reducing emissions and the devastating impacts of climate change. Yet when it comes to developing projects, the industry often faces local opposition from residents on tenuous grounds. But when it comes to fire risk, failing to take steps that address public concerns could result in a damaging reputational hit – particularly if a wind turbine does catch fire.

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August 25, 2021

Consequences of a Turbine Fire Spreading into the Environment

Wind turbine fires are bad news for many reasons. From developers to operators and owners, manufacturers to workers, fire incidents at wind assets can hugely negatively affect everyone. Whether by causing injuries to onsite workers, detriment to future wind projects, or intangible wounds to the reputations of all involved entities – turbine fires deeply mar the industry. 

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August 24, 2021

5 Classes of Fire

Fire departments respond to more than one million fires each year in the United States alone. And while that number has been steadily decreasing since the 1970s, fires still present the potential for extremely hazardous situations whenever they occur. But while they all burn, not all fires are the same. In order to group fires—and the ways to extinguish them—fire professionals developed a system to classify fires.

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August 18, 2021

#1 Reason Container Handling Equipment Catches Fire

On container handlers, hydraulics drive the motion of the boom or arm and can also drive the wheels. Hydraulic oil spraying or leaking from this system and landing on hot components in the engine and hydraulic compartment causes 90% of fires in container handling equipment. Regular hydraulic system maintenance and inspection, procuring quality hydraulic hoses and components, and installing fire suppression systems can significantly reduce productivity and injury risks associated with hydraulic fire. Keep reading to learn more about how the fire starts and how to prevent it.

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July 6, 2021

Why a Hard Insurance Market Could Lead to Mandatory Fire Risk Management

Turbine fires present significant financial and reputational risks to the wind industry. Manufacturers, project owners, and operators have all taken major steps to reduce fire risk, but to date, most wind turbine fires are covered under insurance policies. However, as renewable energy insurers tighten terms and conditions and increase premiums and rates, the wind industry may have to cover more of the cost if a turbine is destroyed by fire.

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July 2, 2021

What Causes Fires at Container Yards?

Container handling equipment is a major contributor to fires in container yards, with a significant percentage resulting from improper equipment maintenance. In a claims analysis by TT Club, a leading insurance provider to the international transport and logistics industry, it was found that 67% of costs related to fire were attributed to yard equipment.

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